World AIDS Day: The Jamey Younger Story

By Jamey Younger

jamey As many of you may know, December 1st is World AIDS Day. As a member of For Colored Girls Who Lead, our tagline is Health. Wealth. Spirituality. One of our initiatives in advocating for people with HIV/AIDS. I have always wanted to share my story, but I was afraid of the backlash. Earlier this year, I lost a close family member, which reignited my need to advocate for positive people and educate everyone. This year I spoke at the Beta Phi Omega Sorority, Inc.: 2019 World AIDS Day Brunch. Now I am sharing my story with you.

In February 2007, I was raped by a neighborhood drug dealer. After the rape, I ran home and soaked in a bath and cried. The next morning, I went to Mercy Hospital, and they couldn’t do rape kit because I already bathed. They tested me for everything, and of course all the tests were negative.

In June 2007, I went to a doctor’s appointment, and I found out that I was pregnant. I was mortified and in shock. The worst part was that my family did not believe that I had been raped. Luckily, I gave birth to a healthy baby boy.

In February 2011, my life changed forever. I had shingles, which is unusual for a healthy person in their early twenties. I laid in bed for days, because I could not walk. I had severe nerve damage in my right hip and painful open wounds on my thigh. I laid in a hospital bed, and I prayed to God. I said “whatever your will is God.” I spoke over myself, saying I will walk in seven days. While I was sick, the doctors tested me for various cancers and HIV. When the doctor came in to give me my positive results, I smiled and said “I don’t know what God’s plan is, but I have a second chance at life. I’m gonna live it by every means necessary.” As soon as the doctor left, I broke down and cried.

I was hurt and angry with everyone. I just couldn’t understand why me. I wasn’t sexually active with men, and I wasn’t on drugs. What did I do to deserve this? Initially, I didn’t take my meds as prescribed. Maybe it was because of denial or anger, but I just didn’t care about myself. Basically, I took it whenever I felt like it.

After I got pregnant with my second child, I knew that I needed to make a change for my child. I didn’t want him to be born HIV positive. I started going to Total Health Care, where I met an amazing therapist and doctors. They made sure I took my medication and worked with me to stay healthy. I started to gain knowledge about HIV, and I learned how to properly take care of myself. After giving birth to a healthy son, I started to slack off again with the meds.
Throughout my life, I was in an unhealthy relationship. When I met my wife, it was a complete change. After being told that I was ugly and no one would ever want someone with HIV, I couldn’t believe that someone actually found me beautiful. It kinda gave me the extra motivation to take better care of myself. I started seeing the beauty in life.

It still amazes me how ignorant people can be about HIV. In 2019, there are people, who think people with HIV/AIDS are unhappy, angry animals who want to rape them. With all the medical knowledge, it is shocking that some people still think like that.

The stigma is why I grind so hard to continue to educate people. I got into the medical field 6 years ago, so I can help others. It is so important that we start saving our youth. This year alone, I have seen at least 25 young people newly diagnosed with HIV. The numbers for young black women with HIV is quite alarming. I plan to start a group to educate women of color, help navigate their journey, and spread the word that undetectable equals untransmittable.

For anyone dealing with a positive diagnosis, HIV is not a death sentence. It is just like any other chronic condition. I’m proud to say I’m undetectable and my CD4 helper cells are 1146. I am no longer a victim, I am a survivor.

9 thoughts on “World AIDS Day: The Jamey Younger Story

  1. God Bless you and your family. That is a heartfelt story and i am always praying for you.Never stop doing what your doing !!! Your a shining star

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    1. Thank you for visiting the site and reading my wife’s story. You are appreciated.

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  2. Awesome just Awesome

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    1. Thank you for visiting the site. 😊😊

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  3. YOU ARE VERY BRAVE AND STRONG YOUNG WOMAN OF GOD. YOU WILL DO A GREAT JOB WORKING WITH OUR YOUNGER SISTERS. THEY NEED SOMEONE THAT KNOWS WHAT THEY ARE GOING THROUGH. A YOUNG LADY WITH YOUR PASSION WILL GO FAR IN THE FIGHT. TO EDUCATE YOUNG LADIES. GIVE THEM HOPE AND LIFE .THEY LEARN CAN LOVE THEMSELVES. AND KNOW THAT THEY ARE LOVED. HELP TAKE AWAY THE STIGMA

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    1. Hi Vanessa. Thank you for visiting and reading Jamey’s story. Your comment was wonderful.

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  4. Amazing life journey you have experienced so far. Thank you so much for sharing your amazing story Jamey. You’re an amazing young woman and I knew that from that from the first day I met you. ❤️💜❤️❤️❤️❤️

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    1. Hi Jeannine. Thank you for stopping by to read Jamey’s story. You are appreciated.

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  5. Shirley Alexander December 3, 2019 — 6:25 pm

    Thank you for your courage and willingness to share for being able to walk in your purpose and for being there for other through empowering and killing the stimaga. Much love Beautiful Sista.

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